Long-Toss Throwing Program by Alan Jaeger

This program is based on 3 days of throwing for Week #1 and then evolves into 4 days of throwing for the next 5 weeks. Jaeger’s program actually encourages the player to throw for 4-5 days in Week #1, considering that Week #1 stipulates the lightest workload. If a player feels a need to throw for more than 4 days a week in any given week, simply do it. Again, the arm will tend to want to increase it’s workload from week to week as it progressively gets into shape. This is the essence of getting your arm into a positive “cycle”: The better shape the arm arm gets into, the more it wants to throw — the more it “needs” to throw. However, this is also where “listening” to a player’s arm takes precedence over any set amount of throws or any specific throwing format.

The following distances suggested in this program are based on a college freshman with average arm strength. Therefore, depending on your specific player’s arm strength and history, you may find that these distances are too restricting, or not challenging enough.

Week #1 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday)

  • 40-60 ft — 15 throws
  • 75 ft — 10 throws
  • 90 ft + (optional 5 additional minutes of throwing and/or increase distance if the arm “asks” for it)
  • 75 ft — 10 throws 60 ft — 10 throws (and any additional throws if needed)

Week #2 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday)

  • 40-60 ft — 15 throws
  • 75 ft — 10 throws
  • 90 ft — 5 throws
  • 105 ft — 5 throws
  • 120 ft — 5 throws
  • 120 ft + (optional 5 additional minutes of throwing at same distance or increase distance if the arm “asks” for it)
  • 105 ft — 3 throws
  • 90 ft — 3 throws
  • 75 ft — 3 throws
  • 60 ft — 5 throws (and any additional throws if needed)

Week #3 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday)

  • 40-60 ft — 15 throws
  • 75 ft — 10 throws
  • 90 ft — 5 throws
  • 105 ft — 5 throws
  • 120 ft — 5 throws
  • 135 ft — 2 throws
  • 150 ft — 2 throws
  • 150 ft + (optional 5 additional minutes of throwing at same distance or increase distance if the arm “asks” for it)
  • 140 ft — 1 throws
  • 130 ft — 1 throws
  • 120 ft — 1 throw
  • 110 ft — 1 throw
  • 100 ft — 1 throw
  • 90 ft — 1 throw
  • 80 ft — 1 throw
  • 70 ft — 1 throw
  • 60 ft — 5 throws (or any additional throws if needed)
  • Note: Flat Ground Work Begins on Tuesday/Friday (10-15 Change Up’s)

Week #4 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday)

  • 40-60 ft — 15 throws
  • 75 ft — 10 throws
  • 90 ft — 5 throws
  • 105 ft — 5 throws
  • 120 ft — 3 throws
  • 135 ft — 3 throws
  • 150 ft — 3 throws
  • 165 ft — 3 throws
  • 180 ft — 3 throws
  • 195 ft — 3 throws
  • 195 ft + (optional — 5-10 minutes of additional throwing at same distance or increase distance if the arm “asks” for it)
  • 180 ft — 1 throws
  • 170 ft — 1 throws
  • 160 ft — 1 throw
  • 150 ft — 1 throw
  • 140 ft — 1 throw
  • 130 ft — 1 throw
  • 120 ft — 1 throw
  • 110 ft — 1 throw
  • 100 ft — 1 throw
  • 90 ft — 1 throw
  • 80 ft — 1 throw
  • 70 ft — 1 throw
  • 60 ft — 5 throws (or more if needed)
  • Note: Flat Ground Work Begins on Tuesday/Friday (10-15 Change Up’s)

Week #5 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday)

  • 40-60 ft — 15 throws
  • 75 ft — 10 throws
  • 90 ft — 5 throws
  • 105 ft — 3 throws
  • 120 ft — 3 throws
  • 135 ft — 3 throws
  • 150 ft — 3 throws
  • 165 ft — 3 throws
  • 180 ft — 3 throws
  • 195 ft — 3 throws
  • 210 ft — 3 throws
  • 225 ft — 3 throws
  • 225 ft + — (optional — 5-10 minutes of additional throwing at same distance or increase distance if the arm “asks” for it)
  • 210 ft — 1 throw
  • 200 ft — 1 throw
  • 190 ft — 1 throw
  • 180 ft — 1 throw
  • 170 ft — 1 throw
  • 160 ft — 1 throw
  • 150 ft — 1 throw
  • 140 ft — 1 throw
  • 130 ft — 1 throw
  • 120 ft — 1 throw
  • 110 ft — 1 throw
  • 100 ft — 1 throw
  • 90 ft — 1 throw
  • 80 ft — 1 throw
  • 70 ft — 1 throw
  • 60 ft — 5 throws (or more if needed)
  • Note: Flat Ground Work Tuesday/Friday — (15 Change-Ups, 10 Light Breaking Balls)

Week #6 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday)

  • 40-60 ft — 15 throws
  • 75 ft — 10 throws
  • 90 ft — 5 throws
  • 105 ft — 3 throws
  • 120 ft — 3 throws
  • 135 ft — 3 throws
  • 150 ft — 3 throws
  • 165 ft — 3 throws
  • 180 ft — 3 throws
  • 195 ft — 3 throws
  • 210 ft — 3 throws
  • 225 ft — 3 throws
  • 240 ft — 3 throws
  • 240 + (optional — 5-10 minutes of additional throwing at same distance or increase distance if the arm “asks” for it)
  • 230 ft — 1 throws
  • 220 ft — 1 throws
  • 210 ft — 1 throw
  • 200 ft — 1 throw
  • 190 ft — 1 throw
  • 180 ft — 1 throw
  • 170 ft — 1 throw
  • 160 ft — 1 throw
  • 150 ft — 1 throw
  • 140 ft — 1 throw
  • 130 ft — 1 throw
  • 120 ft — 1 throw
  • 110 ft — 1 throw
  • 100 ft — 1 throw
  • 90 ft — 1 throw
  • 80 ft — 1 throw
  • 70 ft — 1 throw
  • 60 ft — 5 throws (or more if needed)
  • Note: Flat Ground Work Tuesday/Friday — (15 Change-Ups, 10 Light Breaking Balls)

If you choose the option of throwing beyond the predetermined “peak” throw that day (e.g. 225 feet in Week 5), then once you do peak-out on that day (e.g. 300 feet), remember to come back toward your throwing partner (pull-down phase) 10 feet per throw until you get back into 60 feet. Once at 60 feet, feel free to throw as many as your arm feels it needs at that point. Also, be aware that at 60 feet, especially if you have a strong arm, it may be dangerous to pull-down at this distance. You can finish your pull downs at 65 feet, or whatever distance deems it safe, without sacrificing your effort.

You may find this program works well just as it is, or you may need to adjust it to your needs. The premise is the same: work on building your base (like walking before you jog, and jogging before you run). Increase from 4 to 5 days a week (or from 5 to 6) of throwing if it feels appropriate. There is no obligation to throw on the exact days suggested above, but the format is designed to both optimize recovery time and maximize development. Remember that on any given day, especially into week 5 or 6, if the throwing arm feels like it wants to go beyond 240 feet, follow that instinct. Utilize that 5-10 minute window to allow the arm to continue to “open up” beyond 240 feet. You may be surprised how far out your arm will take you because of the base you’ve developed from the first month.

Pitchers will also notice that by week 4, it is recommended to throw change-ups at the end of your throwing session. Change-ups are relatively easy on the arm, and throwing this pitch after the arm’s been stretched out so well is very effective. It also happens to be a crucial pitch to command for any pitcher. Finally, remember that the bottom line is to “listen to your arm.” How many throws you make at each increment is dependent on how your arm feels. How far you go out, or how fast you come in may vary from day to day. Your job is to put your arm in a position to throw as often as possible, with awareness and sensitivity to your arm, in order to progressively build a strong base. This mentality is what optimizes your ability to insure health, strength, endurance and improved recovery period.

About The Author:
Alan Jaeger is a personal trainer and consultant who has worked with hundreds of amateur athletes, including over 70 professional baseball players. His playing experience includes Los Angeles Pierce Junior College (1984-1985), California State University at Northridge, and the Wichita Broncos of the Jayhawk League (1986). His college coaching experience includes four years (1990-1993) at Los Angeles Mission Junior College/College of the Canyons and seven years as an assistant coach/consultant for the Chatham A’s of the prestigious Cape Cod League.

Author Links:
In 1989, Alan began Jaeger Sports, which provides a facility where athletes from a variety of sports disciplines can solidify the mental side of their game. Graduates, including 2002 Cy Young winner Barry Zito, can attest to a significant improvement in their performance.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Long-Toss Throwing Program by Alan Jaeger

  1. Once I have our players complete the 6 weeks do you then continue to week 7 and so on to see how far you can throw or to just keep your arm strong?

    • The objective is not to see how far you can throw a baseball. Rather, the objective is to build up stamina in the arm. Actually, there are many pitching coaches who do not recommend throwing as far as Alan has laid out in this program, simply because the biomechanics of the throwing motion fundamentally change after you go further than about 130′ which may not be useful for pitchers in particular. Therefore, once you have built up arm strength over the 6 week program (regardless of the distances you use), I would look to sustain the gains achieved without trying to put more needless stress on the arm.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s